NOTICE -- The LBA-ECO Project website is no longer being supported.  This archive is a snapshot, as it existed in 2013, of the LBA-ECO website, maintained by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, and now archived at the ORNL DAAC.  Links to external websites may be inactive. Final data products from the LBA project can be found at the ORNL DAAC.
banner
banner banner banner banner banner banner
banner banner banner banner banner banner banner
home aboutlibrarynews archivecontacts banner

spacer
banner
Investigations
Overview
Abstracts & Profiles
Publications
Research Sites
Meetings
Synthesis Groups
LBA-HYDROMET
LBA-Air-ECO
Logistics
Overview
Field Support
Travel
Visa
Shipping
Data
  Overview
Find LBA Data
Investigator Checklist
Process & Policy
Documentation & Archive
Training & Education
  Overview
Activities Summary
T&E Goals
Student Opportunities
  Folha Amazônica
 
spacer

For details on LBA-HYDROMET research, results and publications, consult the investigation abstracts and profiles.

LBA-HYDROMET was an unofficial module of LBA that lasted from 1999-2003. Research focused on seasonal-to-interannual hydrometeorological prediction and the effects of land cover change in the Amazon region on hydrology and climate.

The project was guided, as are all LBA modules, by Brazilian leadership, and managed in the U.S. as funded by NASA’s Land Surface Hydrology Program (LSHP).

LBA-HYDROMET was included as part of the GEWEX project of the World Climate Research Program.

With eleven investigation teams, LBA-HYDROMET sought to answer the following questions:

  1. What are the surface and meteorological controls on the fluxes of energy and water, and how do they vary both in space, over Amazonia, and in time, between seasons and from year to year, to affect the regional budgets of energy and water?

  2. What are the mesoscale mechanisms by which differences in surface characteristics translate into large scale weather and climate anomalies?

  3. What is the role of dry and moist convection in transferring energy and how will it change with different land use patterns?

  4. How is the rainfall of Amazonia controlled by the large scale land-surface atmosphere interactions? Which areas within Amazonia have the most influence on rainfall and how does this vary with time?

  5. What is the relative importance of Amazonia in generating its own climate compared to the role of external planetary scale forcing, and conversely what is the influence of Amazonia on global climate?

  6. How will the climate of Amazonia change in response to changes in land use and global climate forcing?

  7. What would be the response in the volume and timing of flow in the River Amazon to the changes in climate, particularly rainfall and evaporation, as predicted by General Circulation Models, or which may occur as a result of large scale change in land use?

  8. What are the spatial and temporal pattern of surface and sub-surface water storage and flux in the soils and river corridors of the Amazon Basin, and how are they influenced by variations in climate and land use?

  9. What are the characteristics of soil moisture and river flow for mesoscale basins and how can they be predicted?


Skip navigation linksHOME | ABOUT | LIBRARY | NEWS ARCHIVE | CONTACTS | INVESTIGATIONS | LOGISTICS | DATA |TRAINING & EDUCATION

NASA logo
ORNL DAAC
Get Acrobat Reader