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Investigation:

CD-17 (Ducey / Alves)

LBA Dataset ID:

CD17_Forest_Regrowth_Model

Originator(s):

1. Alves, Dr. Diogenes Salas
2. Ducey, Dr. Mark
3. Salas, Dr. William
      4. Zarin, Dr. Daniel J.
5. Qi, Dr. Jiaguo

Point(s) of Contact:

Zarin, Dr. Daniel J. (zarin@ufl.edu)

Dataset Abstract:

Validating, scaling and parameterizing a forest regrowth model for the amazon region using aircraft and spaceborne sensors and GIS.
The objective of this study was to propose a four-step, incremental approach directed toward the spatially explicit modeling and mapping of forest regrowth potential for the Amazon region. Each of the four steps will make a significant contribution to current understanding of the response of ecosystems to disturbance at the regional scale. Developing an ability to predict forest regrowth potential has considerable implications for our understanding of carbon dynamics in a future characterized by increased conversion of old-growth Amazonian forests and the subsequent abandonment of many areas originally cleared for agricultural activities. A central focus of our approach is the development of remote sensing approaches for quantifying vegetation recovery and changes in biomass following disturbance, determination of the optimal scale for these approaches, and testing of disturbance-specific parameters that may influence rates of forest regrowth in Amazonia.
Data Quality Statement: The Data Center has determined that this data set has missing or incomplete data, metadata, or other documentation resulting in diminished usability of this product. User beware.
Known Problems: Some unresolved issues remain where data values were inconsistent with the variable descriptions provided with the data set.

Beginning Date:

2002-10-05

Ending Date:

2003-11-01

Metadata Last Updated on:

2011-12-30

Data Status:

Not yet in archive queue

Access Constraints:

Public

Data Center URL:

http://daac.ornl.gov

Distribution Contact(s):

ORNL DAAC User Services (ornldaac@ornl.gov)

Access Instructions:

Public

Data Access:

IMPORTANT: The LBA-ECO Project website is no longer being supported. Links to external websites may be inactive. Final data products from the LBA project can be found at the ORNL DAAC. Please follow the fair use guidelines found in the dataset documentation when using or citing LBA data.
Datafile(s):

At LBA DIS: Study Area Summary: CD17_study_area_summary.xls:  Search at ORNL DAAC
At LBA DIS: Canopy Data: CD17_canopy_data.xls:  Search at ORNL DAAC
At LBA DIS: Understory Data: CD17_regeneration_data.xls:  Search at ORNL DAAC
Access data via ORNL DAAC:  Search at ORNL DAAC

Documentation/Other Supporting Documents:

Data Set User's Guide (Draft):  Search at ORNL DAAC

Citation Information - Other Details:

Salas W.A., D.S. Alves, M.J. Ducey, D.J. Zarin & J. Qi. 2009. LBA-ECO CD-17 Amazon Forest Regrowth Model Validation, Scaling and Parameterization. Data set. Available on-line [http://daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A.

Keywords - Theme:

Parameter Topic Term Source Sensor
FOREST COMPOSITION/VEGETATION STRUCTURE LAND SURFACE VEGETATION FIELD SURVEY HUMAN OBSERVER

Uncontrolled Theme Keyword(s):  Biomass, Brazilian Amazon, Carbon dynamics, Tropical Secondary Forest

Keywords - Place (with associated coordinates):

Region
(click to view profile)
Site
(click to view profile)
North South East West
Para Ruropolis -4.09583 -4.09583 -54.90917 -54.90917
Para Eastern (Belem) Sao Francisco do Para -1.16667 -1.16667 -47.75000 -47.75000
Rondonia Alto Paraiso -9.69000 -9.69000 -63.32800 -63.32800

Data Characteristics (Entity and Attribute Overview):

Data Characteristics:

Data Description: Validating, scaling and parameterizing a forest regrowth model for the Amazon region using aircraft and spaceborne sensors and GIS







Spatial Coverage: All data were collected in the Brazilian Amazon at the following sites:




SITE REGION COORDINATES

Sao Francisco do Para Para, Belem, Brazil 47.45 W & 1.10S

Alto Paraiso Rondonia, Brazil 63.19 W & 9.41 S

Ruropolis Para, Brazil 54.54 W & 4.5 S





Temporal Coverage: October 2002 to November 2003.




Temporal Resolution: The data were collected in one single measurement at each site.




Data are provided in 3 data files:

1) CD17_Canopy_Data.xls (Canopy data - Excel spreadsheet containing multiple worksheets)

2) CD17_Regeneration_Data.csv (Understory data)

3) CD17_Study_Area_Summary.csv (Study area description)





1) CD17_Canopy_Data.xls</b>

Column Variable description

Key Description not provided

Region Region where study took place

Site_ID Data collection site

Plant_ID Unique identification number assigned to each plant in the field

Plot_ID Plot identification number

Identifier Person responsible in the field for identifying species

Species_ID Identification number assigned to individual plants in the field

Species_name Species name (after confirmation)

Group Species category: palm, vine, Vismia, Cecropia, Sororoca and all

Live_or_dead Indicates whether the tree was alive (Live) or dead (Dead)

DBH Diameter at breast height (cm)

Height_total Height in meters (m) to the tallest canopy element of selected individuals.

Height_to_crown Height to the lowest live foliage of selected individuals (m)

Distance_N Distance from the tree stem to the furthest canopy element to the north, projected into the horizontal plane

Distance_E Distance from the tree stem to the furthest canopy element to the east, projected into the horizontal plane

Distance_S Distance from the tree stem to the furthest canopy element to the south, projected into the horizontal plane

Distance_W Distance from the tree stem to the furthest canopy element to the west projected into the horizontal plane

Distance Associated with Type A stands only (not Type B) and refers to distance in meters from a reference plot corner (see field protocol for details)

Angle Associated with Type A stands only (not Type B) and refers to angle in degrees from a reference plot corner (see field protocol for details)

Double_tally In Type B stands, whether or not the individual should be counted twice under the walkthrough protocol of Ducey et al. (2004) [Reference: Ducey, M.J., J.H. Gove, and H.T. Valentine. 2004. A walkthrough solution to the boundary overlap problem. Forest Science 50: 427-435.]

Comment General observations about the plant or plot

Common_name Common name of the species used in the region





2)CD17_Regeneration_Data.csv</b>

Variable Variable Description

Region Region, where study took placeL AP= Alto Paraiso, Rondonia; RU=Ruropolis, Para; SF=Sao Francisco do Para, Para

Site name Site where data were gathered

Stand_age Stand age based on interviews (years)

Spacing Spacing between circular plot centers for type B inventory method (see methods section for detail) (meters)

Date Date when data were collected (month and year)

Plot Plot number

Palms No. individuals of all Palm species

Cecropia No. individuals of all Cecropia species

Vismia No. individuals of all Vismia species

Vine No. individuals of all Vine species

Other_erect No. individuals of all Other species

Sororoca No. individuals of all Sororoca species

Herbaceous Classification of the herbaceous cover (ABSENT, LIGHT, MEDIUM, HEAVY or Not recorded)

Vine_0_5 % of vine cover (0-5%)

Vine_5_25 % of vine cover (5-25%)

Vine_25_50 % of vine cover (25-50%)

Vine_50_75 % of vine cover (50-75%)

Vine_75_100 % of vine cover (75-100%)

Vines_canopy Presence of vines in forest canopy: X if yes, blank if no

Vines_understory Presence of vines in forest understory: X if yes, blank if no

Vines_both Presence of vines in both forest canopy and forest understory: X if yes, blank if no

Vines_Cober_Herb Variable description not provided.

Fallen_logs_1 Number of fallen logs (1) (dbh/declination)

Fallen_logs_2 Number of fallen logs (2) (dbh/declination)

Fallen_logs_3 Number of fallen logs (3) (dbh/declination)

Fallen_logs_4 Number of fallen logs (4) (dbh/declination)

Fallen_logs_5 Number of fallen logs (5) (dbh/declination)

Fallen_logs_6 Number of fallen logs (6) (dbh/declination)

Fallen_logs_7 Number of fallen logs (7) (dbh/declination)

Fallen_logs_8 Number of fallen logs (8) (dbh/declination)

Fallen_logs_9 Number of fallen logs (9) (dbh/declination)

Fallen_logs_10 Number of fallen logs (10) (dbh/declination)

Fallen_logs_11 Number of fallen logs (11) (dbh/declination)

Fallen_logs_12 Number of fallen logs (12) (dbh/declination)

Fallen_logs_13 Number of fallen logs (13) (dbh/declination)

Fallen_logs_14 Number of fallen logs (14) (dbh/declination)





3)CD17_Study_Area_Summary.csv</b>

Variable Variable description

Region Study region

Site_ID Site identification code

Owner Property owner

Method Method used: A=intensive and B=extensive. See methods section for details.

Plot_ID Plot code: unique code given to each plot (code for property owner followed by Y, M or O for Young, Medium and Old stand age followed by estimated age)

Age Age of the plot (years) based on interviews with the owner

Age_class Age class: Young, Medium, Old

Number_of_plots Number of plots sampled within each area of a certain age

Area_total Total sampled area (m2)

Data Application and Derivation:

not available

Quality Assessment (Data Quality Attribute Accuracy Report):

Quality Assessment:

not available

Process Description:

Data Acquisition Materials and Methods:

FIELD SAMPLING PROTOCOL



Type A stands are sampled intensively, with the goal of providing high-fidelity spatial information about the 3-dimensional structure of the stand. These stands are defined as 60x60 m (0.36 ha) areas of uniform clearing and abandonment history. These areas should also be identifiable from LANDSAT images.

Type B stands are sampled extensively, with the goal of providing unbiased estimates of biomass, along with some information about the vertical structure of the stand and of spatial variability. These stands are defined as polygons of uniform clearing and afforestation history, based on multitemporal LANDSAT imagery. Their size may vary and their shape may not correspond exactly to any aggregation of LANDSAT pixels.





TYPE A



Type A stands are defined as 60x60m areas, divided into 10x10m grids. The orientation of the grids should be parallel to the pixel grids of the LANDSAT images for the area. For the purposes of these protocols assume that these grids are approximately aligned with the cardinal directions, though this assumption is not critical.



In general, a corner of the stand is located, and its coordinates are recorded using the GPS unit. Layout of the stand may begin with locating any cell corner. There is no special need to begin with A1NW, for example. Then, measurement proceeds from cell to cell in whatever order is most convenient. Within each cell, the understory, midstory, overstory, and downed logs (if any) are measured.



When an extreme corner of the stand (A1NW, A6SW, F1NE, or F6SE) is reached, the coordinates of that corner are recorded using the GPS, and a digital photo is taken facing toward the center of the stand.



The first order of business in establishing a new cell is to flag and label the cell corners. This should be done using the Suunto compass and either the Vertex hypsometer or the distance tape, whichever is more convenient for establishing distances in the stand. Each cell should be 10m square.



Understory Measurement



Understory measurement is done in the SW corner of every cell, using a 1m radius, quarter-circle plot tucked into the corner. All woody stems less than breast height are tallied according to the same functional groups used for overstory trees: palms, Cecropia, Vismia, other erect, and vines. No dimensions (heights or diameters) are taken for these seedlings. The herbaceous understory is characterized subjectively as: absent: no herbaceous cover, light: scattered herbaceous individuals, medium: some patches of cover, contained in a matrix of bare areas, heavy: some bare patches, contained in a matrix of contiguous herbaceous cover, complete: thick herbaceous cover without bare patches.





Midstory Measurement



Midstory stems are defined as stems taller than breast height but less than 5cm DBH. All midstory stems are tallied within a 3m radius, quarter-circle plot tucked into the SW corner of the cell, as shown below. The following variables are recorded for all midstory stems: Functional group: palms, Cecropia, Vismia, other erect, vine, Live or dead, Diameter at breast height, taken with calipers facing the SW corner, in cm. In addition, for the two stems of each functional type that are closest to the SW corner, the following variables should be measured: Height, taken with the Vertex hypsometer, in m., Height to the lowest live foliage, taken with the Vertex hypsometer, in m., Crown width, taken with the Vertex or with a tape, in the four cardinal directions



Overstory Measurement



Overstory stems are defined as all stems greater than 5cm DBH. All overstory stems on the plot are tallied, measured, and mapped. The following variables are recorded for every overstory stem: Distance from the SW corner, m, Bearing from the SW corner, degrees (0-90), Functional group: palms, Cecropia, Vismia, other erect, vine, Live or dead, Diameter at breast height, taken with a DBH tape, in cm.

In addition, for the two stems of each functional type that are closest to the SW corner, the

following variables should be measured: Height, taken with the Vertex hypsometer, in m., Height to the lowest live foliage, taken with the Vertex hypsometer, in m., Crown width, taken with the Vertex or with a tape, in the four cardinal directions.





TYPE B



Type B stands are not defined by a fixed geometric shape, but are defined as polygons recognizable both from the multitemporal LANDSAT images and on the ground. Type B stands are sampled on a grid but the spacing of this grid depends on the size of the stand.



Grid Location, Naming Plots within the Grid, and Grid Spacing



The position of the polygon should be established based on a good GPS position fix. This position fix may be outside the stand (for example, in an adjacent road or clearing). The distance and bearing from this position fix to the center of the first plot must be recorded. This plot serves as the reference location for the position of the stand, and is denoted as plot 0E 0N.



Additional plots will be laid out on a square grid aligned with the LANDSAT grid for the area. Naming of the plots is done with reference to the initial plot. For example, if a plot is one column to the east of the initial plot, and one plot to the north, the plot is 1E 1N. The plot that is one plot west of the initial plot, and three plots south, is 1W 3S.



The spacing of the grid will be variable, so that sampling effort and relative accuracy will be similar regardless of stand size. The following table provides the grid spacing that should be used.



Number of 900m2 LANDSAT Pixels in Stand Grid Spacing, m

1 to 2 6x6

3 to 6 10x10

7 to 12 15x15

13 to 20 20x20

21 to 30 25x25

31 or more 30x30



Field Procedure



The initial plot is located and measured. Then, all plot locations on the grid falling within the stand should be measured. The exact order is not important, but it is important not to skip or omit any valid plot locations within the stand. It is also important not to shift the locations of any plots. Plots should NOT be moved if they fall in unusual areas within the stand, such as gaps. They also should NOT be moved if they fall close to the edge of the stand. Plots near the stand edge require special procedures that are discussed below.



Understory Measurement



Understory measurement is done using an 0.5m radius, full-circle subplot centered on the plot center. All woody stems less than breast height are tallied according to the same functional groups used for overstory trees: palms, Cecropia, Vismia, other erect, and vines. No dimensions (heights or diameters) are taken for these seedlings. The herbaceous understory is characterized subjectively as: absent: no herbaceous cover, light: scattered herbaceous individuals, medium: some patches of cover, contained in a matrix of bare areas, heavy: some bare patches, contained in a matrix of contiguous herbaceous cover, complete: thick herbaceous cover without bare patches.



Midstory Measurement



Midstory stems are defined as stems taller than breast height but less than 5cm DBH. All midstory stems are tallied within a 1m radius, full-circle subplot centered on the plot center. The following variables are recorded for all midstory stems: Functional group: palms, Cecropia, Vismia, other erect, vine, Live or dead, Diameter at breast height, taken with calipers facing the plot center, in cm. In addition, for the one stem of each functional type that is closest to the plot center, the following variables should be measured: Height, taken with the Vertex hypsometer, in m., Height to the lowest live foliage, taken with the Vertex hypsometer, in m., Crown width, taken with the Vertex or with a tape, in the four cardinal directions.



Overstory Measurement



Overstory stems are defined as all stems greater than 5cm DBH. Overstory stems are tallied using a 4m radius circular plot, centered on the plot center. The following variables are recorded for every overstory stem: Functional group: palms, Cecropia, Vismia, other erect, vine, Live or dead, Diameter at breast height, taken with a DBH tape, in cm. In addition, for the one stem of each functional type that is closest to the plot center, the following variables should be measured: Height, taken with the Vertex hypsometer, in m., Height to the lowest live foliage, taken with the Vertex hypsometer, in m., Crown width, taken with the Vertex or with a tape, in the four cardinal directions.

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