NOTICE -- The LBA-ECO Project website is no longer being supported.  This archive is a snapshot, as it existed in 2013, of the LBA-ECO website, maintained by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, and now archived at the ORNL DAAC.  Links to external websites may be inactive. Final data products from the LBA project can be found at the ORNL DAAC.
banner
banner banner banner banner banner banner
banner banner banner banner banner banner banner
home aboutlibrarynews archivecontacts banner

spacer
banner
Investigations
Overview
Abstracts & Profiles
Publications
Research Sites
Meetings
Synthesis Groups
LBA-HYDROMET
LBA-Air-ECO
Logistics
Overview
Field Support
Travel
Visa
Shipping
Data
  Overview
Find LBA Data
Investigator Checklist
Process & Policy
Documentation & Archive
Training & Education
  Overview
Activities Summary
T&E Goals
Student Opportunities
  Folha Amazônica
 
spacer

Investigation:

ND-01 (Roberts / Barreto / Soares)

LBA Dataset ID:

ND01_Spectral_Changes_Aging_Leaves

Originator(s):

1. Chadwick, Oliver A.
2. Roberts, Dar A.
3. Batista, Getulio T.
4. Biggs, Trent W.
      5. Gessler, Paul E.
6. Holmes, Karen W.
7. Tomasella, Javier

Point(s) of Contact:

Holmes, Karen W. (karen@geog.ucsb.edu)
Roberts, Dar A. (dar@geog.ucsb.edu)

Dataset Abstract:

Leaf phenology and spectral changes due to aging in Caatinga leaves in the Amazon.

Beginning Date:

1993-07-13

Ending Date:

1994-09-26

Metadata Last Updated on:

2011-10-04

Data Status:

In Preparation for Archive

Access Constraints:

Public

Data Center URL:

http://daac.ornl.gov

Distribution Contact(s):

ORNL DAAC User Services (ornldaac@ornl.gov)

Access Instructions:

Public

Data Access:

IMPORTANT: The LBA-ECO Project website is no longer being supported. Links to external websites may be inactive. Final data products from the LBA project can be found at the ORNL DAAC. Please follow the fair use guidelines found in the dataset documentation when using or citing LBA data.
Datafile(s):

Coming soon! Access data via ORNL DAAC ftp site for LBA-ECO data:  Search at ORNL DAAC

Documentation/Other Supporting Documents:

Data Set User's Guide (Draft):  Search at ORNL DAAC

Citation Information - Other Details:

Roberts, D.A., B.W. Nelson, J.B. Adams, and F. Palmer. 2011. LBA-ECO ND-01 Leaf Phenology and Spectral Changes in Caatinga Leaves in the Amazon. Data set. Coming soon to the ORNL DAAC [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A.

Keywords - Theme:

Parameter Topic Term Source Sensor
LEAF SPECTRA BIOSPHERE SURFACE RADIATIVE PROPERTIES LABORATORY LICOR INTEGRATING SPHERE
LEAF CHARACTERISTICS BIOSPHERE ECOLOGICAL DYNAMICS LABORATORY SPECTROMETER
REFLECTANCE BIOSPHERE SURFACE RADIATIVE PROPERTIES LABORATORY SPECTROMETER

Uncontrolled Theme Keyword(s):  Aldina heterophylla, Amazon, Caatinga&, Leaf age, Remote sensing

Keywords - Place (with associated coordinates):

Region
(click to view profile)
Site
(click to view profile)
North South East West
Amazonas (Manaus) Reserva Campina
Amazonas (Manaus) ZF2 km 25 - INPA Forest Management Site -2.00000 -2.00000 -61.00000 -61.00000

Related Publication(s):

Roberts, D.A., Nelson, B.N., Adams, J.B., and Palmer, F. 1998, Spectral Changes with Leaf aging in Amazon Caatinga, Trees 12:315-325.

Data Characteristics (Entity and Attribute Overview):

Data Characteristics:

Table 3 Leaf thickness (mm),

average SLA (cm2/g = fresh area/

dry weight) and average specific

leaf volume (cm3/g = fresh

volume/dry weight) in July 1993

and September 1994. N = 6&/

Process Description:

Data Acquisition Materials and Methods:



The study extended over a 16 month period starting on 13 July 1993

and ending on 26 October 1994 (Fig. 2). In the initial survey, in July

1993, leaves were sampled from the six dominants in the study area

(Table 2). Leaves were sampled covering a range of ages from each

species and placed into broad categories of young (unexpanded),

mature and old. They were further categorized on the basis of epiphyll

cover as uncolonized, moderate or heavy cover. Spectra for

two of the species are shown in Fig. 3. Aldina spectra were collected

in more detail, sampled 12 times at monthly intervals, with a gap in

coverage in December 1993, and February, May and August 1994.



Leaf spectroscopy



Leaf spectra were measured using a portable spectrometer (Personal

Spectrometer II, Analytical Spectral Devices, Boulder,

Colo., USA) attached to an integrating sphere (Model 1800�12,

Licor, Lincoln, Neb., USA). All spectra were standardized using a

barium sulfate standard and the calibrated light source supplied by

Licor with the integrating sphere. Integrating sphere performance

and stray light contamination were measured prior to each month�s

measurements to ensure temporal stability. No stray light correction

was applied to the leaf spectra after it was determined to account

for an error of less than 0.2% in most measurements. All instruments

were operated off batteries to ensure a stable energy

source. Leaf reflectance and transmittance were measured for both

surfaces of each leaf using leaf squares cut from the left and right

sides of the leaf taking care to avoid the mid-vein.





Epiphyll identification



Leaf samples were examined to determine the nature of epiphylls

and investigate their potential role in modifying leaf spectra. Specimen

leaves from Aldina, Ouratea, Pradosia and Protium, were

examined in the laboratory and used to isolate epiphylls, primarily

fungi. Isolates from leaf specimens were grown on maltose yeast

extract agar and identified.

References:

Field CB (1991) Ecological scaling of carbon gain to stress and resource availability. In: Mooney H, Winner W, Pell E, (eds) Response of plants to multiple stresses. Academic Press, New York. pp 35�65.



Gamon JB, Field CB, Goulden ML, Griffin KL, Hartley AE, Joel G, Penuelas J, Valentini R (1995) Relationships between NDVI, canopy structure, and Photosynthesis in three California vegetation types. Ecol App 5: 28�41.



Gausman HW (1985) Plant leaf optical properties in visible and near-infrared light. Graduate Studies Texas Technical University, publication no. 29. Texas Technical Press, Texas.



Gausman HW, Allen WA, Cardenas R, Richardson AJ (1970) Relation of light reflectance to histological and physical evaluations of cotton leaf maturity. Appl Opt n: 545�552.



Gausman HW, Allen WA, Cardenas R, Richardson AJ (1973) Reflectance discrimination of cotton and corn at four growth

stages. Agron J 65: 194�198.





Knipling EB (1970) Physical and physiological basis for the reflectance of visible and Near-infrared radiation from vegetation. Remote Sens Environ 1: 155�159.



Lee DW, Bones RA, Tarsis SL, Storch D (1990) Correlates of leaf optical properties in tropical forest sun and extreme-shade plants. Am J Bot 77: 370�380.



Lee DW, Graham R (1986) Leaf optical properties of rainforest and sun extreme shade plants. Am J Bot 73: 1100�1108



Sinclair TR, Hoffer RM, Schreiber MM (1971) Reflectance and internal structure of leaves from several crops during a growing season. Agron 63: 864�868.



Woolley JT (1971) Reflectance and transmittance of light by leaves. Plant Physiol 47: 656�662.

Skip navigation linksHOME | ABOUT | LIBRARY | NEWS ARCHIVE | CONTACTS | INVESTIGATIONS | LOGISTICS | DATA |TRAINING & EDUCATION

NASA logo
ORNL DAAC
Get Acrobat Reader