NOTICE -- The LBA-ECO Project website is no longer being supported.  This archive is a snapshot, as it existed in 2013, of the LBA-ECO website, maintained by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, and now archived at the ORNL DAAC.  Links to external websites may be inactive. Final data products from the LBA project can be found at the ORNL DAAC.
banner
banner banner banner banner banner banner
banner banner banner banner banner banner banner
home aboutlibrarynews archivecontacts banner

spacer
banner
Investigations
Overview
Abstracts & Profiles
Publications
Research Sites
Meetings
Synthesis Groups
LBA-HYDROMET
LBA-Air-ECO
Logistics
Overview
Field Support
Travel
Visa
Shipping
Data
  Overview
Find LBA Data
Investigator Checklist
Process & Policy
Documentation & Archive
Training & Education
  Overview
Activities Summary
T&E Goals
Student Opportunities
  Folha Amazônica
 
spacer

Investigation:

LC-07 (Melack / Novo / Forsberg)

LBA Dataset ID:

LC07_RESERVOIR_METHANE

Originator(s):

LIMA, I.B.T.

Point(s) of Contact:

ORNL DAAC User Services Office Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37 (ornldaac@ornl.gov)

Dataset Abstract:

Biogeochemical distinction of methane emissions to the atmosphere may essentially rely on the surface area and morphometry of Amazon hydroreservoirs. Tucurui (deep) and Samuel (shallow) reservoirs released in average 13.82 +/- 22.94 and 71.19 +/- 107.4 mg CH4 m-2 d-1, respectively. d13C-CH4 values from the sediments to the atmosphere indicate that the deep reservoir has extended methanotrophic layer, oxidizing large quantities of light isotope methane coming from the sediments, while sediment-generated methane can easily evade the shallow reservoir.

Beginning Date:

2000-06-01

Ending Date:

2001-09-30

Metadata Last Updated on:

2011-12-15

Data Status:

Archived

Access Constraints:

PUBLIC

Data Center URL:

http://daac.ornl.gov/

Distribution Contact(s):

ORNL DAAC User Services Office Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37 (ornldaac@ornl.gov)

Access Instructions:

PUBLIC

Data Access:

IMPORTANT: The LBA-ECO Project website is no longer being supported. Links to external websites may be inactive. Final data products from the LBA project can be found at the ORNL DAAC. Please follow the fair use guidelines found in the dataset documentation when using or citing LBA data.
Datafile(s):

LBA-ECO LC-07 Methane Releases from Two Amazon Hydroreservoirs, Brazil: 2000-2001:  http://daac.ornl.gov/cgi-bin/dsviewer.pl?ds_id=1047

Documentation/Other Supporting Documents:

LBA-ECO LC-07 Methane Releases from Two Amazon Hydroreservoirs, Brazil: 2000-2001:  http://daac.ornl.gov/LBA/guides/LC07_Reservoir_Methane_Emissions.html

Citation Information - Other Details:

Lima, I.B.T. 2011. LBA-ECO LC-07 Methane Releases from two Amazon HydroReservoirs, Brazil: 2000-2001. Data set. Available on-line [http://daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. http://dx.doi.org/10.3334/ORNLDAAC/1047

Keywords - Theme:

Parameter Topic Term Source Sensor
METHANE BIOSPHERE ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY GC-FID (GAS CHROMATOGRAPH/FLAME IONIZATION DETECTOR)

Uncontrolled Theme Keyword(s):  AMAZON, HYDROELECTRIC RESERVOIRS, ISOTOPE ANALYSIS, METHANE EMISSION, METHANE FLUX

Keywords - Place (with associated coordinates):

Region
(click to view profile)
Site
(click to view profile)
North South East West
  RONDONIA TOCANTINS -4.33330 -8.80340 -49.41670 -63.85350

Related Publication(s):

Lima, I.B.T. 2005. Biogeochemical distinction of methane releases from two Amazon hydroreservoirs. Chemosphere 59(11):1697-1702.

Data Characteristics (Entity and Attribute Overview):

Data Characteristics:

The data is in an Excel spreadsheet.

Data Application and Derivation:

Application:

This data was used to create a table and three figures in (Lima Chemosphere 2005).

This data has not yet been used in further work.

How might this data be applied? For Amazon methane flux compilation and methane oxidation through Rayleigh models.



Derivation:

The data was derived from concentration and isotope analyses of methane collected.

Quality Assessment (Data Quality Attribute Accuracy Report):

Quality Assessment:

for quality assessment, see reference, section 3.

Methane concentration average analytical error was ca. 3 - 5%.

Process Description:

Data Acquisition Materials and Methods:

Data Acquisition Materials and Methods:

See section 2.2 of reference.

<p>

2.2. Methane fluxes

Static chamber fluxes were estimated on the course of

three field campaigns carried out in Juneâ�â�Åâ�œJuly 2000, in

Juneâ�â�Åâ�œJuly 2001 and in September 2001. Methane fluxes

were acquired relatively far from the shoreline in shallow

(<10 m) and deep (>10 m) locations of both TucuruÃâ�žÃâ�šÃ‚±Ãƒâ�šÃâ�šÃ‚´

and Samuel reservoirs. Each field campaign accomplished

four days of sampling by reservoir. It was obtained

eight methane fluxes per day using two floating

static chambers. By averaging two simultaneous chamber

fluxes, four mean methane fluxes per day were estimated,

gathering a maximum of 16 mean methane

fluxes by reservoir for each of the three field campaigns.

Each chamber has a headspace volume of 36000 cm3

and an exchange area of 1000 cm2. Both chambers were

covered with reflective material to minimize the increase

of inside temperature during deployments of 1 h. Samples

were pumped every 15 min from 5-m length and

3-mm inner diameter nylon tubing with the aid of 60-

ml plastic syringes adapted with luer-lock valves. Gas

samples were then stored by needle injection in 15-ml

pre-evacuated glass flasks sealed with butyl rubber stoppers

for later concentration determination.

Methane concentration was determined with a flame

ionization detector (FID) in a Shimadzu 17A gas chromatograph

(GC). Around 1â�â�Åâ�œ3 ml of gas sample was injected

in the GC system, composed of a system port at

150 degrees C, a 0.53-mm diameter and 30-m length Megabore

column at 45 degrees C, and a FID at 200 degrees C. Average analytical

error was ca. 3â�â�Åâ�œ5%.

Methane fluxes were calculated by / = (Dc/Dt) Ãâ�šÃâ�šÃ‚·

(V/A), where Dc/Dt is the rate of methane concentration

change into the chambers. All fluxes / < 0 were discarded

of the analysis, since, in terms of energy conservation,

Dc/Dt < 0 may represent physically improbable

fluxes. Methane bubbles eventually intercepted some

time series. When bubbles interfered in the beginning

of the deployment, the disturbance created a negative

rate, due to mixing within the chamber and thus dilution

of the bubbles close to the atmospheric methane concentration.

For those cases, methane fluxes were also

discarded.</p>

<p> Method is further discussed in Lima 2005, Section 2. </p>

References:

References documenting this dataset:



Lima IBT. (2005) Blogeochemical distinction of methane releases from two Amazon hydroreservoirs. Chemosphere, 59, 1697-1702.



References citing this dataset:



Ramos FM, Lima IBT, Rosa RR, et al. (2006) Extreme event dynamics in methane ebullition fluxes from tropical reservoirs. Geophysical Research Letters, 33(21), L21404.



Bambace LAW, Ramos FM, Lima IBT, Rosa RR. (2007) Mitigation and recovery of methane emissions from tropical hydroelectric dams. Energy, 32(6), 1038-1046.



Lima IBT, Ramos FM, Bambace LAW, Rosa RR. (2008) Methane Emissions from Large Dams as Renewable Energy Resources: A Developing Nation Perspective. Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, 13(2), 193-206.

Skip navigation linksHOME | ABOUT | LIBRARY | NEWS ARCHIVE | CONTACTS | INVESTIGATIONS | LOGISTICS | DATA |TRAINING & EDUCATION

NASA logo
ORNL DAAC
Get Acrobat Reader