NOTICE -- The LBA-ECO Project website is no longer being supported.  This archive is a snapshot, as it existed in 2013, of the LBA-ECO website, maintained by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, and now archived at the ORNL DAAC.  Links to external websites may be inactive. Final data products from the LBA project can be found at the ORNL DAAC.
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Investigation:

LC-35 (Csiszar / Longo / Setzer)

LBA Dataset ID:

LC35_GOES_WF_ABBA

Originator(s):

UW-MADISON CIMSS GOES BIOMASS BURNING MONITOR

Point(s) of Contact:

ORNL DAAC User Services Office Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37 (ornldaac@ornl.gov)

Dataset Abstract:

The Wildfire Automated Biomass Burning Algorithm (WF_ABBA) is an active fire detection product based on the Geostationary Environmental Operational Satellite (GOES) imager data. It provides high observation frequency (30 minute) for South America at nominal spatial resolution of 4x4 km near the satellite sub-point located at 75 degrees longitude West along the equator. The WF_ABBA is a dynamic multispectral thresholding contextual algorithm that uses the visible (daytime only), 3.9 micron, and 10.7 micron infrared bands to locate and characterize hot spot pixels. The data set represented here is composed of versions 5.9 and 6.0. The latter is expected to better discriminate false detections caused by cloud edges. Differences between the two versions are assumed to be small though (typically less than 10%). Coverage files are also provided to help determine the area coverage of each individual file as the latter will vary according to the instrument scan mode in use. To maintain the integrity of the data, use of this data for publications, posters, or talks requires an offer of authorship to the UW-Madison CIMSS GOES Biomass Burning Monitoring Program. Please send authorship requests to Chris.Schmidt@ssec.wisc.edu or Elaine.Prins@ssec.wisc.edu.

Beginning Date:

2000-01-01

Ending Date:

2005-12-31

Metadata Last Updated on:

2013-08-28

Data Status:

Archived

Access Constraints:

PUBLIC

Data Center URL:

http://daac.ornl.gov/

Distribution Contact(s):

ORNL DAAC User Services Office Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37 (ornldaac@ornl.gov)

Access Instructions:

PUBLIC

Data Access:

IMPORTANT: The LBA-ECO Project website is no longer being supported. Links to external websites may be inactive. Final data products from the LBA project can be found at the ORNL DAAC. Please follow the fair use guidelines found in the dataset documentation when using or citing LBA data.
Datafile(s):

LBA-ECO LC-35 GOES Imager Active Fire Detection Data, South America: 2000-2005 :  http://daac.ornl.gov/cgi-bin/dsviewer.pl?ds_id=1180

Documentation/Other Supporting Documents:

LBA-ECO LC-35 GOES Imager Active Fire Detection Data, South America: 2000-2005 :  http://daac.ornl.gov/LBA/guides/LC35_GOES_WF_ABBA.html

Citation Information - Other Details:

UW-Madison CIMSS GOES Biomass Burning Monitoring Program. 2013. LBA-ECO LC-35 GOES Imager Active Fire Detection Data, South America: 2000-2005. Data set. Available on-line [http://daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee USA http://dx.doi.org/10.3334/ORNLDAAC/1180

Keywords - Theme:

Parameter Topic Term Source Sensor
FIRE OCCURRENCE LAND SURFACE LAND USE/LAND COVER GOES-8 (GEOSTATIONARY OPERATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL SATELLITE-8) GOES-8 IMAGER
FIRE OCCURRENCE LAND SURFACE LAND USE/LAND COVER COMPUTER MODEL ALGORITHM
FIRE OCCURRENCE LAND SURFACE LAND USE/LAND COVER GOES-12 (GEOSTATIONARY OPERATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL SATELLITE-12) GOES I-M IMAGER

Uncontrolled Theme Keyword(s):  BIOMASS BURNING, GOES WILDFIRE ABBA, SOUTH AMERICA, VERSION 5.9 WF_ABBA, VERSION 6.0 WF_ABBA, WF_ABBA COVERAGE FILE PRODUCT, WF_ABBA TEMPORALLY FILTERED FIRE PRODUCT, WILDFIRE ABBA

Keywords - Place (with associated coordinates):

Region
(click to view profile)
Site
(click to view profile)
North South East West
  SOUTH AMERICA REGULAR COVERAGE 13.00000 -20.00000 -25.75000 -82.00000

Related Publication(s):

Schroeder, W., I. Csiszar, and J. Morisette. 2008. Quantifying the impact of cloud obscuration on remote sensing of active fires in the Brazilian Amazon, Remote Sensing of Environment, 112(2), 456-470.

Schroeder, W., Prins, E., Giglio, L., Csiszar, I., Schmidt, C., Morisette, J., and Morton, D. (2008). Validation of GOES and MODIS active fire detection products using ASTER and ETM+ data. Remote Sensing of Environment, 112, 2711-2726.

Data Characteristics (Entity and Attribute Overview):

Data Characteristics:

WF_ABBA Fire Product Information




A.) Temporally Filtered File Product </b>



The file name convention for the temporally filtered fire product ASCII files is as follows:



fyyyydddhhmm.?amer.v??.g?.filt



where yyyy represents the four digit year;

ddd represents the julian day of the year (1-365);

hhmm represents the hour and minute in UTC;

?amer represents the continent (samer = South America);

v?? represents the version number (v59 = version 5.9, v60 = version 6.0) and

g? represents the satellite (g8=GOES-8, g12=GOES-12).





Please bear in mind the following when using the Wildfire ABBA (versions 5.9 and 6.0) fire products:



1.) Each file provides the following information for each recorded fire pixel:



- Location in terms of latitude and longitude (degrees). Note that typically navigation is valid to within approximately 4-5 km at the sub-satellite point and increases to nearly 8-10 km at a satellite view angle of 50 degrees. At times it can be worse due to maneuvers and other issues.

- 4 and 11 micron observed brightness temperature values (K).

- Instantaneous estimates of sub-pixel fire size (km2) and temperature (K) when available. This is NOT an estimate of burned area!

- GLCC land cover characteristics ecosystem type (http://edcdaac.usgs.gov/glcc/glcc.html, version 2.0).

- Fire flag (ranging from 0 to 5) where the numbers represent the following.

0 - Fire pixel that could be processed for sub-pixel instantaneous estimates of fire size and temperature.

1 - Saturated pixel. The temperature of the fire pixel was higher than the sensor could evaluate and the pixel could not be processed for sub-pixel fire characteristics.

2 - The fire pixel was cloudy and could not be processed for sub-pixel fire characteristics.

3 - This is a high probability fire pixel. Keep monitoring for future development.

4 - This is a medium probability fire pixel. Keep monitoring for future development.

5 - This is a low probability fire pixel. This category is often indicative of false alarms in North America and along cloud edges and at high viewing angles at sunrise and sunset, but should be monitored over time.



2.) The value -9 indicates that this parameter was not available or could not be computed for this particular fire pixel, but the fire pixel is still valid.



3.) The temporally filtered fire product only contains fire pixels that have appeared more than once within the past 12 hours It is the most conservative and should be used if the user wants to minimize false alarms. Line 4 of the header in the filtered output ASCII file contains information on the number of hours/files that were available for the temporal filtering. At times, the temporally filtered file will not be available because not enough of the previous files were available to conduct the filtering.



4.) To maintain the integrity of the data, use of this data for publications, posters, or talks requires an offer of authorship to the UW-Madison CIMSS GOES Biomass Burning Monitoring Program. Please send authorship requests to Chris.Schmidt@ssec.wisc.edu or Elaine.Prins@ssec.wisc.edu.






B.) Coverage File Product:</b>



The file name convention for the coverage product ASCII files is as follows:



g???americayyyy_cov.txt



where g?? represents the satellite (g08 = GOES-8, g12 = GOES-12); ?america represents the continent (samerica = South America) and yyyy represents the four digit year.





** Note that in 2003 there are two coverage files for GOES-East South America (one for GOES-8 and one for GOES-12), the GOES-8 coverage file extends from Julian date 2003001 through 2003089, while the GOES-12 coverage file extends from 2003090 through2003365.









Please consider the following when using the coverage file product:



1.) The coverage file product is used to describe the polygon domain of the non-filtered final ASCII files. It consists of a series of locations (latitudes/longitudes) that depicts the spatial domain of the non-filtered file at each time. Coverage files are divided by year and satellite.





** There are 14 parameters at each non-filtered file time in the coverage file. ** The date and time are provided as well as 12 parameters that define the polygon outline of the domain region of the data. The parameters are as follows:

- Four digit year and julian day (for example, 2000001 describes year 2000 and julian day 001)

- hhmmss (hour/minute/second; for example 173000 is 1730 UTC)

- Upper left coordinate of data domain (Latitude/Longitude)

- Upper right coordinate of data domain (Latitude/Longitude)

- Top middle coordinate of data domain (Latitude/Longitude)

- Lower middle coordinate of data domain (Latitude/Longitude)

- Left coordinate 1 of data domain (Latitude/Longitude), not included for South America coverage, therefore assigned a -999.00

- Left coordinate 2 of data domain (Latitude/Longitude)

- Left coordinate 3 of data domain (Latitude/Longitude)

- Left coordinate 4 (Lower left coordinate) of data domain (Latitude/Longitude)

- Right coordinate 1 of data domain (Latitude/Longitude), not included for South America coverage, therefore assigned a -999.00

- Right coordinate 2 of data domain (Latitude/Longitude)

- Right coordinate 3 of data domain (Latitude/Longitude)

- Right coordinate 4 (Lower right coordinate) of data domain (Latitude/Longitude)



** Note that a -999.00 denotes a missing coordinate

** Left 2,3,4 and Right 2,3,4 define the bound coordinates for the lower half part of the coverage area. These coordinates are used to help create a more realistic representation of the image area as the latter does not describe an exact square. An example of image coverage area and the descriptors above for a regular image scan mode, a full disk scan mode, and rapid scan operation can be found at ftp://daac.ornl.gov/data/lba/land_use_land_cover_change/LC35_GOES_WF_ABBA/comp/SA_COVERAGE_PLOT_POINTS_REGULAR.GIF, ftp://daac.ornl.gov/data/lba/land_use_land_cover_change/LC35_GOES_WF_ABBA/comp/SA_COVERAGE_PLOT_POINTS_FD.GIF, and ftp://daac.ornl.gov/data/lba/land_use_land_cover_change/LC35_GOES_WF_ABBA/comp/SA_COVERAGE_PLOT_POINTS_RSO.GIF, respectively.



2.) The spatial domain consists of full coverage of South America every three hours (at Full Disk satellite imagery times: 0245, 0545, 0845, 1145, 1445, 1745, 2045, and 2345 UTC).



3.) Coverage extends to a latitude of 20 degrees South every half hour except when the satellite is in Rapid Scan Operations mode. When Rapid Scan Operations occurs coverage extends only to a latitude of approximately 2 degrees South (No coverage for most of South America). For RSO coverage; L2, L3, R2, and R3 coordinates are assigned a value of -999.00 (since there is no data at these locations for RSO).



4.) To maintain the integrity of the data, use of this data for publications, posters, or talks requires an offer of authorship to the UW-Madison CIMSS GOES Biomass Burning Monitoring Program. Please send authorship requests to Chris.Schmidt@ssec.wisc.edu or Elaine.Prins@ssec.wisc.edu.



The datum used to generate the above data sets was the 1924 International Standard Geodetic Datum, which differs slightly from the WGS-84 (the WGS-84 value for radius of Earth is 251 meters less than the 1924 International Standard). See link below for additional information:

http://www.kolumbus.fi/eino.uikkanen/geodocsgb/ficoords.htm



Alternatively, the user can opt to work with the more popular WGS-84 Datum as no significant effect should be noticed in the location of the detections.

Data Application and Derivation:

The geographic coordinates contained in this data set correspond to areas of thermal anomalies identified primarily in the fire sensitive mid-infrared spectral region data of the multispectral imager on board the GOES 8 and 12 satellites. Although the occurrences are in majority associated with vegetation fires, other surface features (e.g., warm bright soils) can also cause abnormal high responses in the mid-infrared channel and therefore produce a detection. The user must also be aware that, despite the 4x4km nominal spatial resolution of the product, vegetation fires will normally occupy only a small fraction of the pixel. Similarly, multiple fire lines may be also described by a single detection. Lastly, navigation drifts must be accounted for when analyzing multi-temporal detections.

Quality Assessment (Data Quality Attribute Accuracy Report):

Quality Assessment:

A thorough validation of this product was implemented by Schroeder et al. (in preparation). Commission errors were estimated to represent 3% of all detections. Omission errors vary as a function of fire size (graphs available in the referred publication).

Process Description:

Data Acquisition Materials and Methods:

This data set consists of GOES imager WildFire Automated Biomass Burning Algorithm (WFABBA) product processed at full spatial (4x4 km) and temporal (30 minutes) instrument resolution.

References:

Matson, M., and J. Dozier, 1981: Identification of subresolution high temperature sources using a thermal IR sensor. Photo. Engr. and Rem. Sens., 47, 1311-1318.



Prins, E.M. and W.P. Menzel, 1992: Geostationary satellite detection of biomass burning in South America. Int. J. of Remote Sensing, 13, 2783-2799.



Prins, E.M. and W.P. Menzel, 1994: Trends in South American biomass burning detected with the GOES visible infrared spin scan radiometer atmospheric sounder from 1983 to 1991. Jour. Geo. Res., 99, D8, 16719-16735.



Prins, E.M. and J.M. Feltz, 1998: Characterizing spatial and temporal distributions of biomass burning using multi-spectral geostationary satellite data. Ninth Conference on Satellite Meteorology and Oceanography, Paris, France, May 25-29, 1998, pp. 94-97.



Prins, E.M., J.M. Feltz, W.P. Menzel, and D.E. Ward, 1998: An overview of GOES-8 diurnal fire and smoke results for SCAR-B and the 1995 fire season in South America. J. Geophys. Res., 103, D24, 31821-31836.





Prins, E.M., J.M. Feltz, and C. Schmidt, 2001: An overview of active fire detection and monitoring using meteorological satellites, Proceedings of the 11th Conference on Satellite Meteorology and Oceanography, Madison, WI, October 15-18, 2001, pp. 1-8.



Prins, E.M., J. Schmetz, L. Flynn, D. Hillger, and J.M. Feltz, 2001: Overview of current and future diurnal active fire monitoring using a suite of international geostationary satellites, In Global and Regional Wildfire Monitoring: Current Status and Future Plans, SPB Academic Publishing, The Hague, Netherlands, pp. 145-170.

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