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[1] Forest fragmentation due to deforestation is one of the major causes of forest degradation in the Amazon. Biomass collapse near forest edges, especially within 100 m, alters aboveground biomass and has potentially important implications for carbon emissions in the region. This phenomenon is tightly linked to spatial and temporal dynamics of forest edges in a landscape. However, the potential biomass loss and carbon emissions from forest edges and these spatiotemporal changes have never been estimated for actual landscapes in the Amazon. We conducted a deep temporal analysis of Rondonia, southwestern Brazilian Amazonia, using six Landsat path-row scenes covering the 1985-2008 time period to estimate annual biomass loss and associated carbon emissions within 100 m of forest edges. Annual edge biomass loss averaged 9.1% of the biomass loss from deforestation during the study period, whereas average annual edge-related carbon emissions from biomass loss were 6.0% of deforestation-derived carbon emissions. However, because many edges were subsequently deforested during the 24 year study period, actual unaccounted for edge-related carbon emissions during the 1985-2008 period, calculated from edges of all ages extant on the landscape in 2008, amounted to 3.6% of that attributed to all deforestation-derived carbon fluxes for this time interval. Biomass loss and carbon emissions are highly influenced by the extent and age of edge-affected forests. Large annual contributions of biomass loss and carbon emissions were found from active deforestation regions with young edges, whereas regions dominated by older edges had lower biomass loss and carbon emissions from edges.

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